Stacks Image 110
Coronavirus - Consistent with Government regulations the Malton & Norton Heritage Centre is temporarily closed … … but don't worry, we'll be back as soon as we can!

Early Photographs

Cartes de Visite were small photographs (the size of a visiting card) and mounted on thin card approximately 4 x 2 ½ inches. These were first used in Paris and then shortly introduced into England in 1857. It was previously possible to have a photograph taken but it was challenging and expensive to produce multiple copies. The technique for producing Cartes de Visite involved taking several photographs on a single photographic plate. This enabled copies to be produced and distributed among family and friends and this initiated a desire to collect. In 1860 this was fuelled by the availability of Carte de Visite portraits for the Royal family. The hobby was popular in Malton, as evidenced not only by the survival of many examples but also by the advertising of photographic albums by the local stationers.

Cabinet Cards were introduced in the 1860s and gradually replaced the Carte de Visite format. They were larger and generally printed on thicker cardboard, usually the photographer’s details were at the bottom. On the back there may be simple printing of a pattern or advertisement. These designs became more elaborate as time went on. Cabinet Cards declined in popularity following the introduction of photographic postcards.

Dating Early Photographs

The name of the photographer will often be the best clue to the date of the photograph. Carte de visite printed on thinner card and with square corners tend to be the earlier and therefore likely 1860s examples. Later cards, produced in the 1870s are on thicker card and may have rounded corners

Cardboard mounts for cabinet cards tended to be cream coloured at first with richer colours such as black, brown, green and burgundy appearing later in the 1880s and 1890s. Of course clothing is another clue when trying to date these photographs and a number of websites give some guidance on this.

Early Photographers

Before the advent of Cartes de Visite there were photographers based in or visiting Malton. Messrs Kain & Gouldier advertised in the Malton & Norton Gazette in October 1855 that they had 'opened a new photographic and Daguerreotype portrait gallery - back of Finkle Street and near the Primitive Methodist Chapel where the finest of photographs will be taken.' A Mr Bankes, Collodiotype artist, advertises in the Malton Messenger in February 1856 that he has opened a portrait room at the back of Finle Street (perhaps he succeeded Messrs Kaim & Gouldier). He claimed his portraits 'surpassed anything of the kind ever introduced in Malton.'

Richard E O'Connor, living in Saville street is the only photographer in Malton listed in the 1861 census, although Matthew Bankes is listed as'phptographic artist' in Chancery Lane.

In 1862 WS & E Hall, in Finkle street were describing themselves as photographers. In 1863 a Mr Bumby opened 'portrait rooms' near the Railway station. A trade directory dated 1867 describes John Milner as a photographer in St Michael street.

By 1870, William Froom had opened his photgraphic studio near the railway station. His premises were destroyed by fore in 1872 and his business was in liquidation in 1875. In 1876 Matthew Boak purchased these premises and moved to the Market place. Matthew Boak died in 1906 and the business was taken a while after by Harry Edwards.

John Mahoney described himself as 'an artist in photography' operating from the Albert Studio in St Michael's street.

Albert Bradbury is listed in an 1893 trade directory as running a jewellers and photography business in St Michael street.

Charles Bogg is operating from 7 St Michael street and is listed in an 1897 trade directory. Those premises were then occupied by brothers Randolph and Stanley Smith. This partnership did not last long and was dissolved in 1902. Randolph remained in Malton to run the business for many years. Stanley died in Scarborough in 1906.

Carte de Visite
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
Cabinet Cards
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.
A short description about the image.


Contact Us

Contact us by email
Reg'd Charity No: 1177312
Our address:
Malton & Norton Heritage Centre
3 Commercial Street
Norton YO17 9HX

Our opening hours are:
Regrettably we are currently operating an 'appointments only policy' to ensure the safety of staff and visitors. Please contact us via the email link above to arrange an appointment.

My Image

Please Donate

The Woodhams Stone Collection is entirely run by volunteers and is housed in the Malton & Norton Heritage Centre. A donation however small would help towards our running costs and the purchase of archive quality materials required to store and preserve the Collection for future generations. If you should decide to donate via the PayPal button neither you nor Woodhams Stone Collection will be charged a fee for this donation.

At the end of the transaction you will be asked if you wish the payment to be made as part of the GiftAid scheme. If you are a UK taxpayer and able to do this it means that Woodhams Stone Collection can benefit by an additional 25% of your donation.

My Image
My Image

Malton & Norton Memories

This group is for those who are interested in life as it used to be in the twin towns of Malton and Norton. It is chiefly a showcase for photos and items from the Woodhams-Stone Collection but you are welcome to post any comments, memories or photos you may have to share.

My Image